John Thompson Jr. Biography: Wiki, Age, Career, Death Cause

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Who is John Thompson Jr.? John Thompson Jr. Biography & Wiki

John Robert Thompson Jr. for the Georgetown Hoyas was an American men’s college basketball coach. He was born on September 2, 1941, in Washington, D.C. He became the first African-American head coach to win a major college championship in 1984 when Patrick Ewing led the Hoyas over the Houston Cougars to an NCAA Division I national championship. Thompson was inducted into the National College Basketball Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. He had retired from coaching and became a commentator on radio and television sports. Thompson starred for the Providence Friars in college basketball and in 1964 received honorable mention of All-American honors. He was picked by the Boston Celtics in the third round of the 1964 NBA draft. He played for the Celtics for two seasons, winning an NBA championship in both seasons. Thompson came to Washington D.C. as a high school teacher. While playing for 27 seasons at Georgetown.

Thompson guided Carroll to a record of 24–0 and maintained their 48-game winning streak along the way. With a 57–55 victory over St Catherine’s Angels of Racine, WI in the Knights of Columbus National Championship Game, Carroll finished off the unbeaten 1960 season with Thompson leading the Lions with 15 points. Thompson ended the season in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference as top scorer, scoring 21 points per game.

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John Thompson Age

He was 78 years old.

John Thompson Career

After graduating from Archbishop Carroll, Thompson went to Providence College where he played with Ray Flynn on the 1963 NIT Championship team and was part of his senior year’s first Providence NCAA tournament team in 1964 when he earned an honorable mention for his All-American team from the Associated Press. Upon graduation, Thompson was the Friars’ all-time leader in points, scoring average, and field goal percentage, and second in rebounds. [citation needed] Thompson is currently 11th on the PC’s all-time scoring list, fourth on the average score, sixth on the field goal percentage, and third on the rebounds. He was selected in the third round in 1964 and played for the Boston Celtics from 1964 to 1966 in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He backed up Bill Russell, the Celtics star center, on the way to two championships, at 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) and 270 lb (120 kg). Nicknamed “The Caddy” for Russell’s secondary position, he averaged 3.5 points and played 3.5 rebounds in 74 games. In 1966 he retired to pursue a much more fruitful coaching career.

Went on with JunksRadio to talk about Big John in the final segment.

He has received seven Coach of the Year awards: Big East (1980, 1987, 1992), the U.S. Basketball Writers Association and The Sporting News (1984), the Basketball Coaches National Association (1985), and United Press International (1987). Thompson coached a number of prominent players including Patrick Ewing, Sleepy Floyd, Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo, and Allen Iverson. In the NBA Draft, 26 players were drafted under Thompson, eight in the first round and two players were chosen for the first overall, Ewing by the New York Knicks in 1985 and Iverson by the Philadelphia 76ers in 1996.

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Thompson walked off the floor of the Capital Center on January 14, 1989, before Georgetown’s home game against Boston College began, and handed over coaching duties to assistant Mike Riley. Thompson opposed the NCAA’s Proposition 48, which would prevent scholarship athletes from playing their freshman years if they were not academically eligible.

John Thompson Death Cause

Thompson died, aged 78, on 31 August 2020. Initially, the news was announced by The Team 980 and 95.9FM, Washington, D.C.

After the news of His Death Broke Tributes to Thompson

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